Drawing a Crowd From Dynamic Creativity

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A Crwth is an ancient stringed instrument with it’s roots in early Anglo-Celtic culture, a predecessor of the modern guitar it was played by traveling musicians across Europe. My surname, Crowther, is derived from these musical storytellers who unlike me, had a fairly high social status. That’s because they were an influential alternative source of information from that of the Church. While both the Church and Crwth players used storytelling, music and performance to get their message across, the tone was very different between the two, the Church used authority and consistency, Crwth players were the entertainers, using more emotion through music, rhyme, drama and comedy to tell stories of battles and affairs of court. They became influential because of their popularity, the English word Crowd is derived from the large gatherings that resulted from a Crwth player arriving in a town with the latest ‘entertainment’ news. Information has always been power, the Church distributed theirs through scripture as they controlled the production of books. Before the invention of the printing press, books were expensive to produce, they took many man hours to produce but with monasteries across Europe, they had access to a dedicated workforce. Books ensured the distribution of a consistent message, where as word of mouth can get skewed to the priorities of the storyteller, where they are and the mood they’re in at the time the stories being retold.

So what does this have to do with modern day advertising? Media traditionally has been planned around frequency, repetition of a consistent brand message which creates familiarity and has the effect of psychologically conditioning consumers, making it easy to subconsciously select a brand from amongst the ‘noise’ of competing brands. Of course this can be amplified if you simply don’t allow or greatly restrict any competing noise, something the Church learnt thousands of years ago and is also being practiced in many London Tube stations by the Trivago poster campaign.

Some commentators haven’t minced their words on the subject, like this article in The Drum - Doing shit work is easy when nobody gives a fuck - I understand the frustration expressed by Dave in this article, however I doubt any of the people he chastises were even employed, it’s a cost efficiency driven econometric tested results driven campaign, globally planned and created in-house on a shoestring (shoot me if I write that sentence ever again). That’s my explanation of it, not excuse for it, because as with Dave it goes against all my creative instincts, media brawn over creative brains. I took the picture above at Westminster Station and you can’t ignore them but I would have loved it if the final poster in the line had the Trivago girl being caught with her feet up, cup of tea in hand and searching for a new more interesting job, quick Indeed/Monster get in there!

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The psychologist Ivan Pavlov with the help of his hungry dogs proved the concept of classical conditioning, however what is lesser known is that when he tried to repeat his experiments in front of guests the dogs didn’t respond as before. As well as identifying classical conditioning, Pavlov had identified something he termed the orienting response, which is a reaction to novel or significant stimuli. New people coming into the house are suddenly more interesting and overrides the conditioned response, humans like dogs are curious creatures. I’ve mentioned in earlier blog posts that communication is a process of appealing to both our conscious and subconscious brain. What Crwth players and live performers of any kind have learnt, is that their performances have more impact the more emotional, dramatic, entertaining and tailored to the priorities of the audience they can make them. Due to the fact their method of delivery was live and dynamic by necessity, it lacked the consistency of written word being spread from the pulpit, but they used that to their advantage by reacting to significant stimuli all around them to tailor their storytelling.

Dynamic, personalised creative allows brands to reflect this human instinct and can either be used to elicit the subconscious conditioned response for brand building or provide the conscious significant stimuli of the orienting response for tactical messaging.

If you’d like to hear more about the power of personalised dynamic creative, please get in touch. I‘m perhaps an example of nominative determinism, travelling and presenting through sound, although I’ve ditched the Crwth for an iPod.

Sam Crowther

Sam is fascinated by sound, particularly understanding how and why it affects us in the way it does. As well as developing the understanding of how we apply dynamic personalised sound within ads Sam tests the creative boundaries of this format to make them more human.